Tag Archives: police

Clean Up on Isle 1, 2, 3, 4, 5…

11 Aug

And so the clean up begins! A very strong police presence on the streets of London prevented a fifth night of rioting. It looks like the idiocy is coming to an end! The latest figures are quite impressive – the BBC quoted 1300 in one of their visual reports for the Midlands, and over 800 for London alone. It’s hard to say whether these people will actually serve time. Personally, I would rather see them do community service than jail time. The jails are more like three star hotels these days. My opinion is that I’d rather be paying to have people watch them do things for the community, like helping to rebuild the shops they’ve destroyed, litter-picking, roadworks, decorating, than pay to have them fed three square meals a day without having to work in a cushty prison cell. The prisons were full after the fourth night of chaos, so the most logical thing would be to get these people in bright orange jump suits and give them a broom. I can think of quite a few members of the community who would volunteer to supervise this. I certainly would! I’m not the only one either, as is evident by this email;

Stacey in Canterbury emails: “I agree [with Claire from London], part of the punishment for people charged should be to learn what impact their actions had on their community. Make them rebuild local shops, clean up their streets and rebuild the homes of those they destroyed. Perhaps then they will feel remorse for what damage they have caused to this society.

Cameron finally allowed the use of water cannons and rubber bullets, as well as giving the police the power to force people to remove head-coverings if they’re acting suspiciously. I like this. I think this should stay for good. They were hiding their faces – even attacked a cameraman who was filming their vandalism – so, by removing their anonymity, I believe that it may prevent them from doing anything like this again. They’re cowards. All of them. And it also makes them less scary to the public. My nan finds nothing scarier than a chav in one of those dodgy caps with their hood pulled up, but take that same chav and pull their hood down, maybe take their cap off, and a lot of the fear is removed. These aren’t dangerous gangsters; these are naughty children who deserve a violent caning across the backside, and their PS3 taking away.

But what of the clean up operation? Cameron described the “broom army” which helped clean up streets in Clapham, South London, and elsewhere as “the best of British”. They are. These people give me hope in humanity again; it was refreshing to be lambasted with images of strangers helping each other clean up Sainsbury’s, and local shops, who in turn supplied tea and muffins a-plenty, rather than greedy youths still televisions. It is unfortunate that the international community will not take these images as an example of what the British community is really like as a whole. Instead, when preparing to visit for 2012, they will be haunted by the spectre of the masked, hooded vandal smashing up shops; too ignorant and uneducated to even know who was in power at the time, rioting through greed and getting their kicks out of needlessly smashing through windows and setting cars alight. It sucks.

According to the news, court proceedings have been running through the night like a conveyer belt system. Someone as young as eleven has already been charged. That’s no older than my littlest cousin, for God’s sake! There’s got to be something seriously wrong with the parents when an eleven year old is out smashing through shop windows rather than playing with dolls or watching Hannah Montana on the Disney Channel. Bah! I have to admit though, there is something strangely satisfying about watching people have their front door smashed in, and then observing them being hauled out by the armpits, followed closely behind by, not drugs, but bags of tagged up clothes from JD Sports and a 50″ LCD TV.

Well, I hope that frozen pizza and Xbox were worth it, muppets; justice is a-coming!

Edit: Just a quick thank you to all my casual readers; I have hit 100 views! Chuffed to bits.

Advertisements

This wasn’t an angry crowd, this was a greedy crowd.

9 Aug

Obligatory riot post incoming! If you are English then it would have been very hard for you to miss the rioting in our city-centres over the last few days. Five nights of looting and mindless violence. It all started when a young man by the name of Mark Duggan was shot by police, and a peaceful protest was started outside the police station. This peaceful protest culminated in the destruction of parts of London that some media sources have compared to the Blitz. But these riots didn’t stay in London, oh no, they spread to Birmingham, Liverpool and Bristol as well. They came dangerously close to home for me as Cheshunt and Enfield became hotbeds of unrest as well. Over the last couple of days, my evenings have been filled with the frantic shrill of police, ambulance and fire engine sirens hurtling passed my house. I have yet to visit Cheshunt, and I’m too scared yet to head into Enfield. This is complete and utter madness.

I’ve been watching/listening to coverage while I work, and more and more stories are coming to light about acts of mindless vandilism, but also acts of bravery. Uncharacteristically, the Daily Mail published a story involving the heroics of some of our foreign residents: “The relative calm in Dalston was laid at the door of ‘heroic mobs’ of Turkish men standing guard in the high street, one resident said. In the busy shopping street of Green Street, in Forest Hill, there were reports that 400 young Asian men had chased off up to 150 rioters.” This made my heart swell with pride for humanity. Against this backdrop of chaos and violence, there are still people taking a stand to protect their homes. When I read the last part, my brain started conjuring up images of Jackie Chan laying some smack-down. Not PC? I don’t care. It’s brilliant imagery.

So what are the excuses? Disaffected youths. Poverty. Unemployment. Boredom. Is this disease of violence the result of our society? I can’t help but recall Norman Tebbit’s immortal words, “He didn’t riot. He got on his bike and looked for work.” When did this attitude to life disappear? Why are these children (because that’s what they are, really) in school? Why do they see rioting as an acceptable means to lash out for any cause? Personally, I don’t think there is any excuse for these people. Disaffected? Angry? So what. I’m their age, more or less, but am I rioting? No. I worked hard. I’m at University. I’m setting up my future.  I listened to one piece of coverage where reporters were questioning two female rioters drinking from a bottle of Rosé at 9am this morning. They said they were ‘punishing the rich’, showing the police they could ‘do whatever they wanted’, and that this was all the government’s fault. When the reporter asked why they were burning down their own communities, and the small businesses around them, again… they said they were ‘punishing the rich’. Rich?! These people have worked hard to build their businesses off the ground. Worked. Something those two little brats have probably never done in their life. That small corner shop? I bet he barely makes ends meet. I bet he drives a second hand car on its last legs. I bet he works hard to feed his family. And what have you done? Stolen his hard-earned goods, and then set fire to his home.

Many complaints have been made about the lack of response to police. I have to disagree. If the sirens constantly buzzing passed my house are anything to go by, then the police are obviously doing everything they can at short notice. There aren’t many of them. They’re overstretched, underpaid and restrained by political correctness and health and safety. If I were Cameron now, I would have Parliament declare a state of emergency, allow the use of water guns, tear gas and rubber bullets, and have the Army roll out a show of force. Tonight I would make sure no yob, or ‘disaffected youth’, would be left under any illusion that they could ‘do whatever they wanted’. Yet again it has been demonstrated that our police are too restricted in what they can and can’t do. It’s time to loosen the leash. It’s time for political correctness to take a step back and let the police police us. These people, who are destroying our community, they do not deserve a soft touch. At the moment the law is protecting them by restraining the police. They deserve an ass kicking. And I can only hope they get one.